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CNA Giving Medicine

If you are a certified nurse assistant you may be required to give medicine at times to patients. But why is cna giving medicine not the best option always? You may find this a strange question to ask, but read on and you will see why. Tracy Weber, Charles Ornstein and Marshall Allen explain:

CNA Giving Medicine

CNA Giving Medicine

CNA Giving Medicine

NYU’s Langone Medical Center announced this week that it was adopting new procedures after the death of a 12-year old boy from septic shock. The hospital’s emergency room sent Rory Staunton home in March and then failed to notify his doctor or family of lab results showing he was suffering from a raging infection.

In response to the case, which was closely covered by The New York Times, the hospital promised a bunch of basic fixes: ER doctors should be immediately notified of certain abnormal lab results and, if such results come in after a patient is sent home, the hospital should call the patient and his doctor.

As veteran health reporters, we wish we could tell you that this case will spur changes in emergency rooms across the nation, that never again will a hospital make such an avoidable mistake. But, sadly, decades of experience covering such incidents suggest the medical system may prove resistant to change. Forget about every hospital rewriting its procedures. History suggests it would be a victory if NYU Langone manages to follow its own new rules as we all hope they will.

It’s long been known that medical errors are a major problem2014a national panel concluded more than a decade ago that nearly 100,000 people die each year as a result of errors in hospitals. Despite the resulting national focus on patient safety, patients continue to be harmed and killed by medical shortcuts, inadequate training and breakdowns in communication.

Unlike the airline industry, which relies on a safety net of checklists, the medical community has been slow to adopt them in all areas and often puts its faith in the outdated idea that doctors are infallible.

Time and again reporters have uncovered unfathomable lapses at medical facilities, often resulting in patient injuries and death. Time and again, hospital officials have put in place solutions that seem ridiculously obvious.

And, inconceivably, the fixes are frequently ignored or ineffective.

That’s why we at ProPublica are working on a project to document cases of harm to patients. (If you or a loved one has been harmed while undergoing medical care, will you please share your story with us by filling out our Patient Harm Questionnaire.)

Few medical skills seem as basic as operating on the right body part of a patient. Yet, Rhode Island Hospital, the main teaching hospital of Brown University’s medical school, couldn’t get its surgeons to identify the right one.

Three times in 2007, surgeons there drilled into the wrong side of patients’ heads. After the second incident, the state health department ordered the hospital to hire a consultant and to double-check surgical sites. After the third, the department reprimanded the hospital and fined it $50,000.

But in May 2009, it happened again. During an operation to fix a child’s cleft palate, a surgeon at Rhode Island Hospital operated on the wrong side of the patient’s mouth. And then, in October of that year, an orthopedic surgeon operated on the wrong finger of a patient.

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Giving medicine, you would hope would make the patient better not worse. This is why we said earlier that CNA Giving Medicine is not always the best option. But you may have a different opinion. Why not let us know your opinion below. Leave us a comment.

 

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